ARTISTIC INTIFADA إنتفاضة فنية

© Artistic Intifada

05
25

Camp Faces (Wujooh Min Al Mukhayyam)

Creator: Reem Al Banna | 2011

Directed by Hassan Al Tanji. Artistic Director: Saleem Mhanna”

Found here

04
10

Change Makers

Creator: Susanne Bosch | 2012

"Examining the concept of humanity in Jericho, Susanne Bosch — a German artist dividing her time between Belfast and Berlin — took a three-hour silent walk with 75 participants that brought them to a socialist agricultural project from the 1940s funded by the Arab Development Society. The project had a goal of establishing a self-sufficient Palestinian community that could survive without aid, debts and credit. While the ADS initiative, if largely defunct now, was an interesting one, the piece seems far removed from the original idea of a silent walk. Perhaps more interesting are the notes written by some of the participants in the walk, published on the artist’s website (www.susannebosch.de). From comments about the beautiful silence of the procession, to statements such as “Why was I created a Palestinian?”, the notes seem to indicate more about the humanity of Jericho than the investigation of the Arab Development Society. In the gallery, the artist explores the founding ideas behind the Arab Development Society. Her three-part installation features pages from a history book of the ADS, projections of video footage of the project, and a seating area with books and listening materials.”

Found here 

04
10

Untitled

Creator: Iyad Issa | 2013

"Palestinian artist Iyad Issa, exploring the idea of contemporaneity, organized a fleet of brightly-colored four-wheeled vehicles to take participants off-roading in Jericho. The cars visited desert terrain, refugee camps, housing developments built of steel, and the archaeological site of Hisham’s Palace, among other locations in the city. In the exhibition, a bright red jeep faces a wall. Visitors are allowed to enter the jeep and watch video footage of the excursions projected on the wall in front of it. The simulated tours were meant to explore the idea of Jericho as an oasis, surrounded by the existing conflict, but the sites that the jeeps visited allowed for speculation on some of the contradictions in this idea, and in the development of the city."

Found here

04
10

The Keeper

Creator: Shuruq Harb | 2012

"An artist book that tells the story of her encounter with Mustafa, a young street vender in downtown Ramallah, who sells images culled from the Internet to the public. Over the last decade, Mustafa downloaded and sold the most popular political and entertainment images that have been in high demand by the Palestinian public. Harb comes in contact with Mustafa while she is researching the different kinds of images that circulate in the public sphere in Ramallah city. Upon her encounter with him, she tries to salvage what is left over from his unsold collection. Flipping through the fragile low-resolution photographs, she is overwhelmed by the diversity of the collection. In an attempt to identify the sources and content of the images, she begins to refresh her memory by returning to the Internet.”

Found here

04
10

It Collapses in the Living Room

Creator: Samah Hijawi | 2013

"Jordan-based artist Samah Hijawi took on the concept of land by investigating the geological possibility of earthquakes along the Great Rift Valley. The artist pondered the consequences of all of historic Palestine disappearing in the aftermath of an earthquake. From this idea, Hijawi brought her project to Jericho’s main public square, inviting citizens to come and discuss the idea of a complete disappearance of the land of Palestine, and re-imagine their personal political solutions based on that. The artist took her public debate and placed it back in the context of the home, creating a livingroom with couches, coffee tables, a rug and a television playing footage of the political conversations."

Found here

04
10

Journey to the Moon

Creator: Sarah Beddington | 2013

"British artist Sarah Beddington devised [a] public procession through Jericho…based on bird migration. The artist and volunteers wore embroidered cloaks as they walked up Wadi al-Auja, close to Jericho, pausing to read excerpts from a 12th-century Sufi poem that describes a spiritual migration of birds in search of a leader."

Found here

12
11

The Gaza Stripper

Creator: Kim Badawi | 2012

"One thing that is cool about hijab (Muslim head scarf) for me, is that I get to experience the other side of how people treat you. At work, I get treated a certain way because I’m in a stripper outfit. And the next day I can put on a hijab, a long dress, pants, long sleeves, and high neck, and people will be like, ‘Oh, she’s so pious, she’s probably a virgin.’” The Gaza Stripper Her name is Ari Lauren Souad Said. Born of an Israeli mother and a Palestinian father, she spent much of her childhood torn between two conflicting faiths and cultures in Israel. In her teens she was sent to live with her grandparents in Texas where she lives today with her four year old daughter, Avigail-Jerusalem Said. Mom by day, and topless dancer by night, the “Gaza Stripper “ as she is known, is her stage name. Once a practicing Jew she now identifies more closely with Islam. Her tattoos act as a witness and corporal stigmata of her clash of identities. She now faces the same challenge herself in raising her own daughter of mixed faith heritage. “I don’t’ feel like it’s fair that you should be forced to pick a side and chose, especially if you’re half (Palestinian) – half (Israeli). People don’t realize how very very similar Jewish and Muslim customs actually are…even how Hebrew and Arabic sound a lot alike or even look a lot alike…it’s almost like they are the same religion. We just use different words for things.” Since she was 18 years old, Ari works as a topless dancer locally around Austin and at strip clubs by the military facilities in Aberdine. She also raises her daughter alone. After putting her daughter to bed, Ari leaves to work in the strip clubs throughout the night, and often returns home in the early morning. She will then drive Avigail-Jerusalem to day school then return home to sleep. Since Ari was 8-months pregnant, Avigail-Jerusalem’s father has been out of the picture. “I tried to work it out with my daughter’s dad – even though I didn’t like him. Because I know what it feels to have one side of your family hate your other parent. And pretend to like you. Or genuinely like you. But either way your like “Dude, I’m like half that and your fucking telling me you hate it? How is that supposed to make me feel? - So then even though I desperately don’t like him, myself, I don’t ever want her to have that feeling; that I hate part of her because I don’t. I love every part of her. “ Formerly a Suicide Girl model, Ari has covered much of her body with references to English literature, political and religious references in both Arabic and Hebrew and with what she calls “cute” animals. Her knuckles for instance spell out “ West-Bank”, while one of her Hebrew tattoos states, " I don’t believe in God". In another instance, an Arabic tattoo wrapping around her neck reads in bold characters, "I am haram (sin)”. “Suicide Girls was created by girls who decided to commit “social suicide” - like getting tattoos, body modifications, and stuff. You know, pretty girls that normally people would be like “Oh, look at the beautiful girl“, but then they get all these body modifications and things that were not originally accepted as a form of beauty.” ***Update: Ari was killed in a car accident this Spring. She passed away on May 28, 2011. She was only 27 years old."

Found here

12
04

Untitled (Erasing The Major Museums)

image

Creator: Meir Gal | 1996

"Every aerial photograph taken in Israel must be submitted to an army censor for inspection in order to check if state military secrets have been disclosed. The censor then erases from the photographs the areas used for military purposes as well as facilities and institutions whose function is to enhance and protect state security. Photographers are forbidden to show these erased areas and failure to comply is considered a violation of state security.

Museums in Israel have ignored the political realities within which they are operating.  Not only have they not offered any resistance to or critique of the state ideology, but for the most part have supported and collaborated with government offices and the army. As such, museums are nothing but a disguised function of state apparatus and therefore should be officially perceived as military facilities.  I therefore decided, in compliance with army regulations, to erase museums, like other security sensitive institutions, so that their location will not be disclosed and state security compromised.”

12
01

Timeline of Violence

Creator: Visualizing Palestine | 2012

"Palestinian and Israeli Deaths Since 2000"

Found here

12
01

Handala [In Memory of Naji Salim Al-Ali]

Creator: Warsheh | 2012

"In memory of Naji Salim Al-Ali"

Found here